provocation

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English provocacioun, from Old French provocacion, from Late Latin prōvocātiō, prōvocātiōnem, from Latin prōvocō. Doublet of provokatsiya.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

provocation (countable and uncountable, plural provocations)

  1. The act of provoking, inciting or annoying someone into doing something
  2. Something that provokes; a provocative act
  3. (emergency medicine) The second step in OPQRST regarding the investigation of what makes the symptoms MOI or NOI improve or deteriorate.
    When it's time to check for provocation, ask the patient about what makes their chief complaint better or worse.

Usage notesEdit

Usually followed by of, to, or for: provocation of violence (less common:to, rare:for), provocation to war (less common: of, for).

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin provocatio, provocationem, from Latin provoco.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

provocation f (plural provocations)

  1. provocation

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Polish: prowokacja
  • Turkish: provokasyon

Further readingEdit