regnant

See also: régnant

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French régnant and its source, the present participle of Latin regnāre.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

regnant (not comparable)

  1. Reigning, ruling; currently holding power. [from 15th c.]
    • 1910, A. M. Fairbairn, Studies in Religion and Theology, page 99
      The people are now the State, their will is the regnant will, and that will has this characteristic — it loves principles, it hates compromises; and the principles it loves must be regulative, fit to be applied to the work and guidance of life.
  2. Dominant; holding sway; having particular power or influence. [from 17th c.]
    • 2010, Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22, Atlantic 2011, p. 7:
      The doors of his temples were kept open in time of war, the time in which the ideas of contradiction and conflict are most naturally regnant.
  3. (postpositive) of a monarch, ruling in one's one right; often contrasted with consort and dowager
    Queen Elizabeth II reigns as queen regnant, unlike her mother Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

regnant (plural regnants)

  1. (obsolete) A sovereign or ruler.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

regnant

  1. present participle of regnar

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

rēgnant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of rēgnō