consort

See also: Consort

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French, ultimately from Latin cōnsors.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

consort (countable and uncountable, plural consorts)

  1. The spouse of a monarch.
  2. A husband, wife, companion or partner.
  3. A ship accompanying another.
  4. (uncountable) Association or partnership.
    • 1687, Francis Atterbury, An Answer to some Considerations, the Spirit of Martin Luther and the Original of the Reformation
      Take it singly, and it carries an air of levity; [] but, in consort with the rest, you see, has a meaning quite different.
  5. A group or company, especially of musicians playing the same type of instrument.
  6. (obsolete) Harmony of sounds; concert, as of musical instruments.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

consort (third-person singular simple present consorts, present participle consorting, simple past and past participle consorted)

  1. (intransitive) To associate or keep company (with).
  2. (intransitive) To be in agreement.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin consors, consortem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

consort f (plural consorts)

  1. consort
  2. (plural only, preceded by et, slightly derogatory) minions, associates; the likes
    Facebook, Myspace et consorts.
    Facebook, Myspace and the likes.

Further readingEdit