consort

See also: Consort

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French, ultimately from Latin cōnsors.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

consort (countable and uncountable, plural consorts)

  1. The spouse of a monarch.
    The consort of the queen has passed from this troubled sphere.
  2. A husband, wife, companion or partner.
  3. (euphemistic, sometimes humorous) An informal, usually well-publicized sexual companion of a monarch, aristocrat, celebrity, etc.
  4. A ship accompanying another.
  5. (uncountable) Association or partnership.
    • 1687, Francis Atterbury, An Answer to Some Considerations on the Spirit of Martin Luther and the Original of the Reformation; [], Oxford, Oxfordshire: [] [Sheldonian] Theater, OCLC 1227545844:
      Take it singly, and it carries an air of levity; [] but, in consort with the rest, you see, has a meaning quite different.
  6. A group or company, especially of musicians playing the same type of instrument.
  7. (obsolete) Harmony of sounds; concert, as of musical instruments.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

consort (not comparable)

  1. (postpositive) of a title, by virtue of one's (living) spouse; often contrasted with regnant and dowager
    Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother took on nearly as many duties as queen dowager, after her husband's death, as she had had when she was queen consort during his reign.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

consort (third-person singular simple present consorts, present participle consorting, simple past and past participle consorted)

  1. (intransitive) To associate or keep company (with).
  2. (intransitive) To be in agreement.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin consors.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

consort m or f (plural consorts)

  1. partner, consort
  2. (law) spouse
    Synonym: cònjuge
  3. (law) accomplice
    Synonym: partícip
  4. (law) joinder
    Synonym: litisconsort

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin consors, consortem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

consort f (plural consorts)

  1. consort
  2. (plural only, preceded by et, slightly derogatory) minions, associates; the likes
    Facebook, Myspace et consorts.
    Facebook, Myspace and the likes.

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French consort, from Latin consors.

NounEdit

consort m (plural consorți)

  1. consort

DeclensionEdit