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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin repulsus, from repellere (to drive back), from re- (back) + pellere (to drive).

For spelling, as in pulse, the -e (on -lse) is so the end is pronounced /ls/, rather than /lz/ as in pulls, and does not change the vowel (‘u’). Compare else, false, convulse.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

repulse (third-person singular simple present repulses, present participle repulsing, simple past and past participle repulsed)

  1. (transitive) To repel or drive back.
    to repulse an assault; to repulse the enemy
  2. (transitive) To reject or rebuff.
    to repulse a suitor
  3. (transitive) To cause revulsion in.
    The smell of rotting food repulsed me.
    I find your conduct reprehensible, disgusting, and it repulses me, the way a mongoose repulses a snake.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

repulse (plural repulses)

  1. the act of repulsing or the state of being repulsed
  2. refusal, rejection or repulsion

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

repulse

  1. third-person singular past historic of repellere

NounEdit

repulse

  1. plural of repulso

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

repulse

  1. vocative masculine singular of repulsus

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

repulse

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of repulsar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of repulsar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of repulsar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of repulsar.