EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From roll +‎ -y. Compare older roly-poly.

AdjectiveEdit

rolly (not generally comparable, comparative more rolly, superlative most rolly)

  1. (informal, not comparable) Rolling; having the ability to roll, usually due to wheels attached on the bottom.
    • 1957, Vinnie Williams, The Fruit Tramp:
      “Back east, eh?” Jogi plucked a rolly bug from a grape. He said in a dry tone, “He didn't like you working for us, did he?”
    • 2009, Garland Stewart, Say Uncle, page 166:
      We went inside, with Gayleen taking a little longer than usual due to her walking stick and her portable oxygen tank on a little rolly cart, and got a good table in the smoking section.
  2. (nautical, of the sea, comparable) Rough, turbulent, characterized by large or rapid waves.
    • 1995 January, Tim Murphy, “The San Diego uncertainty principle”, in Cruising World[1], page 63:
      San Diego’s legacy to America’s Cup history has little to do with the light-air, rolly-sea conditions off Point Loma
    • 2005, Lona Gray, Caught by the Lure of the Sea[2], page 168:
      As soon as the Wave passed by—our earlier complacency had only cost us a few hours of discomfort, but no real danger—we up anchored to see if we could find somewhere in the anchorage that was less rolly.

NounEdit

rolly (plural rollies)

  1. (mining, historical) Alternative form of rolley
  2. (informal) A hand-rolled cigarette.
    • 2005, Daithidh MacEochaidh, Travels with Chinaski, page 13:
      His rolly had gone out and he stuck his head down to light the doff off the gas and burnt his left eyebrow as the cooker had one of those rare spats,
    • 2014, Abbie Ross, Hippie Dinners[3], page 232:
      He came and sat down and took a rolly from Julian. [] ‘That way madness lies,’ said my father, flicking the end of the rolly into an empty mug.