turbulent

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin turbulentus, from turba (disorder, tumult).

PronunciationEdit

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AdjectiveEdit

turbulent (comparative more turbulent, superlative most turbulent)

  1. Violently disturbed or agitated; tempestuous, tumultuous.
    It is dangerous to sail in turbulent seas.
  2. Being in, or causing, disturbance or unrest.
    • 2013 August 10, Lexington, “Keeping the mighty honest”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8848: 
      The [Washington] Post's proprietor through those turbulent [Watergate] days, Katharine Graham, held a double place in Washington’s hierarchy: at once regal Georgetown hostess and scrappy newshound, ready to hold the establishment to account. That is a very American position.
    The mid-19th century was a turbulent time in American history.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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External linksEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

turbulent m (feminine turbulente, masculine plural turbulents, feminine plural turbulentes)

  1. turbulent
  2. unruly

GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

turbulent (comparative turbulenter, superlative am turbulentesten)

  1. turbulent

DeclensionEdit

Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 14:25