sag off

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

sag off

  1. (idiomatic) To skive, to not attend school when required to do so.
    • 1995, Angela Devlin, Criminal classes: offenders at school - Page 109
      "I was in the third year at school and I was sagging off with a few of my mates. We were on a building site and two of us got arrested and given a caution. "
    • 2008, Katie Flynn, Sunshine and Shadows - Page 280
      And you were academically bright, which I certainly had not expected, because Maggie told me how you were always sagging off school, only going in a couple of times a term to fetch books because you were an avid reader.
  2. (idiomatic, basketball) This word needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    • 2002, Clay Kallam, Girls' Basketball: Building a Winning Program - Page 51
      Instead, the on-ball defender (in zone or man) will sag off toward the basket, cutting off passing lanes and adding more help to the interior.
    • 2009, Fran Dunphy, Lawrence Hsieh, The Baffled Parent's Guide to Great Basketball Plays - Page 89
      If Daniel is out of shooting range when he gives up his dribble, consider having the defender sag off the ball toward the basket and anticipate the next pass. (Note that sagging off is recommended only for advanced players with good judgement).
  3. (idiomatic, nautical) This word needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    • 2008, Ian Proctor, Racing Dinghy Maintenance - Page 120
      The effect of this downwards pull is to eliminate excessive twist and sagging off to leeward at the head of the sail and to allow a little more flow or belly near the luff.
  4. Used other than as an idiom: sag off.
    His trousers were sagging off his legs.
Last modified on 18 June 2013, at 20:46