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EnglishEdit

 
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A conical urn-shaped silver-plated samovar

EtymologyEdit

From Russian самова́р (samovár, self-boiler); from само́ (samó, self) + вари́ть (varítʹ, "to boil" or "to cook")

NounEdit

samovar (plural samovars)

  1. A metal urn with a spigot, for boiling water for making tea. Traditionally, the water is heated by hot coals or charcoal in a chimney-like tube which runs through the center of the urn. Today, it is more likely that the water is heated by an electric coil.
    • 1919, Ronald Firbank, Valmouth, Duckworth, hardback edition, page 107
      Come on now with the samovar - and make haste sorting the letter-bag.
    • 1932, Maurice Baring, chapter 20, in Friday's Business[1]:
      Eurydice pointed to the cupboard, and sat down on the low divan with folded hands, and looked at the floor. [] Elsa made her drink a glass of vodka. Then she fetched the samovar from the kitchen, and made tea.

TranslationsEdit


AzeriEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Russian самова́р (samovár).

NounEdit

samovar (definite accusative samovarı, plural samovarlar)

  1. samovar

DeclensionEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Russian самова́р (samovár).

NounEdit

samovar m (plural samovars)

  1. samovar

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French samovar, from Russian самова́р (samovár).

NounEdit

samovar m (plural samovares)

  1. samovar (metal urn used to make tea)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Russian самова́р (samovár), literally “self-boiler”; from само́ (samó) “self” + вари́ть (varítʹ) “to boil” or “to cook”.

NounEdit

samovar m (Cyrillic spelling самовар)

  1. samovar