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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Old French escanteler, eschanteler.

VerbEdit

scantle (third-person singular simple present scantles, present participle scantling, simple past and past participle scantled)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To scant; to be niggardly with; to divide into small pieces; to cut short or down.
    • J. Webster
      All their pay / Must your discretion scantle; keep it back.

Etymology 2Edit

scant +‎ -le

VerbEdit

scantle (third-person singular simple present scantles, present participle scantling, simple past and past participle scantled)

  1. (intransitive) To be deficient; to fail.
    • Michael Drayton
      That in her scantled banks, though wand'ring long inclos'd,

NounEdit

scantle (plural scantles)

  1. A gauge for measuring slates.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for scantle in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit