See also: Schadenfreude

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from German Schadenfreude(joy in the misfortune of others), from Schaden(damage, misfortune) + Freude(joy). The word gained popularity in English in the late 20th c.[1] and likely entered mainstream usage through an episode of The Simpsons[2] (more in citations).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

schadenfreude ‎(uncountable)

  1. Malicious enjoyment derived from observing someone else's misfortune.
    • 1897, Arthur Schopenhauer, Thomas Bailey Saunders (translator), "Human Nature", The Essays of Arthur Schopenhauer,
      But it is Schadenfreude, a mischievous delight in the misfortunes of others, which remains the worst trait in human nature.

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See alsoEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “schadenfreude”, in Google books Ngram Viewer[1], accessed November 8, 2016
  2. ^ “Words at play: schadenfreude”, in Merriam Webster[2], accessed November 8, 2016

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