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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek σχίζω (skhízō, to split) +‎ -oid, from εἶδος (eîdos, form, likeness).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈskɪtsɔɪd/, /ˈskɪdzɔɪd/

AdjectiveEdit

schizoid (comparative more schizoid, superlative most schizoid)

  1. characterized by social withdrawal and emotional coldness or flattened affectivity
    • 1974, Thomas S. Szasz, M.D., chapter 8, in The Myth of Mental Illness[1], →ISBN, page 135:
      Abstract symbol systems, such as mathematics, are especially valuable for object-seeking for schizoid personalities. By means of such symbolizations, object contact may be sought and obtained, while at the same time a psychological distance may be maintained between self and other; it is virtually impossible to have a personal relationship and at the same time to maintain such distance.
  2. (archaic) schizophrenic
  3. (figuratively) Behaving as if one has more than one personality; wildly changeable.
    • 1972, Roy Temple House, ‎Ernst Erich Noth, Books Abroad (volume 46, page 32)
      Babits himself never fully lived up to this program; indeed, the declaration itself shows his schizoid attitude toward poetry: he wants to say out loud that he does not want to be heard.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

schizoid (plural schizoids)

  1. (psychiatry) someone with schizoid personality disorder
  2. (archaic) someone with schizophrenia

TranslationsEdit

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