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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French sembler, from Old French sambler, sembler, from Late Latin similāre, present active infinitive of similō, from Latin similis. Doublet of simuler.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sɑ̃.ble/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

sembler

  1. (intransitive, impersonal) to seem, to resemble
  2. (intransitive) to appear

Usage notesEdit

  • When the verb sembler is followed by the subordinating conjunction que, the following verb is in the subjunctive mood:
    Il semble qu'il pleuve
  • However this is not the case when sembler is used affirmatively with an indirect object:
    Il me semble qu'il pleut

ConjugationEdit

This verb is impersonal and is conjugated only in the third-person singular.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sembler.

VerbEdit

sembler

  1. to seem; to appear

ConjugationEdit

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

sembler

  1. Alternative form of sambler

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. In the present tense an extra supporting e is needed in the first-person singular indicative and throughout the singular subjunctive, and the third-person singular subjunctive ending -t is lost. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.