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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Medieval Latin instrumentalis, from instruere (to build into, set up, construct, furnish, hence "to train"), from in- (on) + struere (to put together, arrange, pile up, build, construct), from Proto-Indo-European *strew- (to spread, to strew).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

instrumental (comparative more instrumental, superlative most instrumental)

  1. Acting as an instrument; serving as a means; contributing to promote; conductive; helpful; serviceable; essential or central.
    He was instrumental in conducting the business.
    • (Can we date this quote?), William Shakespeare, Hamlet, I,ii
      The head is not more native to the heart, The hand more instrumental to the mouth —
    • 2012, Christoper Zara, Tortured Artists: From Picasso and Monroe to Warhol and Winehouse, the Twisted Secrets of the World's Most Creative Minds, part 1, chapter 2, 51:
      Few songwriters have been as instrumental in creating the mold for American music.
  2. (music) Pertaining to, made by, or prepared for, an instrument, especially a musical instrument.
    instrumental music
  3. (grammar) Applied to a case expressing means or agency, generally indicated in English by by or with with the objective.
    the instrumental case

Coordinate termsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

instrumental (countable and uncountable, plural instrumentals)

  1. (uncountable, grammar) The instrumental case.
  2. (countable, music) A composition written or performed without lyrics, sometimes using a lead instrument to replace vocals.
    • 1977, Stereo Review (volume 38, page 70)
      I recommend this album in the face of the fact that five of the eleven songs are the purest filler, dull instrumentals with a harmonica rifling over an indifferent rhythm section. The rest is magnificent []

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


CatalanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

instrumental (masculine and feminine plural instrumentals)

  1. instrumental

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

instrumental (feminine singular instrumentale, masculine plural instrumentaux, feminine plural instrumentales)

  1. instrumental

NounEdit

instrumental m (plural instrumentaux)

  1. (grammar) the instrumental case

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French instrumental.

Instrument +‎ -al

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

instrumental (not comparable)

  1. (music) instrumental

AntonymsEdit

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

instrumental m, f (plural instrumentais, comparable)

  1. (music) instrumental (having no singing)
  2. (grammar) instrumental (pertaining to the instrumental case)

NounEdit

instrumental m (plural instrumentais)

  1. (uncountable, grammar) instrumental (grammatical case)
  2. (countable, music) instrumental (composition without singing)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

ȉnstrumentāl m (Cyrillic spelling и̏нструмента̄л)

  1. the instrumental case
  2. (music) a composition made for instruments only or a (version of some) song in which only the instruments are heard

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

instrumental (plural instrumentales)

  1. instrumental