See also: side-by-side

English

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Noun

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side by side (plural side by sides)

  1. Alternative spelling of side-by-side

Adjective

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side by side (not comparable)

  1. Alternative spelling of side-by-side

Adverb

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side by side (not comparable)

  1. (literally) Beside or alongside one another; close to one another and abreast.
    The new houses were built side by side, facing the lake.
    • 1950 March, H. A. Vallance, “On Foot Across the Forth Bridge”, in Railway Magazine, page 148:
      The structure was examined and passed by the Board of Trade in February, 1890, after it had been tested with two trains of 50 loaded wagons, each hauled by two engines, and pushed by a third. The trains ran side by side, and their combined weight, including the six engines, was 1,800 tons. The deflections of the girders were precisely in accordance with the calculations of the engineers.
    • 1960 September, “Talking of Trains: New level-crossing signs”, in Trains Illustrated, page 519:
      Two lamps mounted side by side about two feet apart will flash alternately and when this happens traffic must stop; disobedience of these signs becomes an offence.
  2. (figuratively) In peace. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  3. (figuratively) With a common purpose.
    The soldiers of XX and YY were fighting side by side against a common enemy.

Synonyms

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Translations

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