EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English beside, besiden (also besides > besides), from Old English be sīdan, bī sīdan (by the side (of), on the side (of)), equivalent to be- +‎ side. Compare Saterland Frisian biesiede (aside), German Low German bisied (aside), German beiseite (aside, to one side). Compare also Dutch terzijde (aside).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

beside

  1. Next to; at the side of.
    A small table beside the bed
  2. Not relevant to.
    That is beside the point
  3. Besides; in addition to.
    • (Can we date this quote by Alexander Pope and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      To all beside, as much an empty shade, / An Eugene living, as a Caesar dead.

Usage notesEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

beside (not comparable)

  1. otherwise; else
    • (Can we date this quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley and provide title, author's full name, and other details?), Ozymandias:
      Nothing beside remains. Round the decay / Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare / The lone and level sands stretch far away.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit