EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps related to snite (verb), or perhaps related to gnast.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

snaste (plural snastes)

  1. (obsolete, dialectal) The burnt or burning part of the wick of a candle; the snuff.
    • 1626, Francis Bacon, Natural History, page 127:
      Till some part of the candle was consumed, and the dust gathered about the snaste; but then it made the snaste big, and long, and to burn duskishly.
    • 1865, Edward FitzGerald, Works, page 426:
      A coming letter is foretold by a projecting spark on the snaste.
    • 1899, Fison, Merry Suf., page 62:
      As that snaste of that candle, goos out.

VerbEdit

snaste (third-person singular simple present snastes, present participle snasting, simple past and past participle snasted)

  1. (transitive, obsolete, dialectal) To snuff a candle.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ snast in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  2. ^ “SNASTE” in Joseph Wright, editor, The English Dialect Dictionary: [], volume V (R–S), London: Published by Henry Frowde, [], publisher to the English Dialect Society, []; New York, N.Y.: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1905, →OCLC.

AnagramsEdit