Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From socius ‎(associated, allied; partner, companion, ally).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

societās f ‎(genitive societātis); third declension

  1. A union for a common purpose; society, fellowship, partnership, association, community, union; affinity.
  2. (metonymically) Those united for a common purpose; a company or society of such persons.
  3. (by extension) A copartnership, membership, or association for trading purposes.
  4. (by extension) A share or stake in a partnership or association
  5. (by extension) A political league, alliance, confederacy.

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative societās societātēs
genitive societātis societātum
dative societātī societātibus
accusative societātem societātēs
ablative societāte societātibus
vocative societās societātēs

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • societas in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • societas in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • SOCIETAS in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • societas in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be united by having a common language: eiusdem linguae societate coniunctum esse cum aliquo (De Or. 3. 59. 223)
    • social life: vitae societas
    • to associate with some one: societatem inire, facere cum aliquo
    • to unite isolated individuals into a society: dissipatos homines in (ad) societatem vitae convocare (Tusc. 1. 25. 62)
  • societas in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
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