sollemnis

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Traditionally from sollus (whole, entire) + annus (year), but the dissimilation within a geminate this requires is bizarre. Szemerényi proposes an old middle participle of soleo but has difficulty accounting for the geminate ll. Nussbaum offers sollus + epulum (feast, banquet), taking the latter component to have originally meant "ritual", with dissimilation ll...l > ll...n. [1]

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sollemnis (neuter sollemne, comparative sollemnior, adverb sollemniter); third-declension two-termination adjective

  1. yearly, annually
  2. established, appointed, fixed
  3. common, usual, customary, ordinary, ritual, traditional
  4. religious, solemn, ceremonial; festive
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension two-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative sollemnis sollemne sollemnēs sollemnia
Genitive sollemnis sollemnium
Dative sollemnī sollemnibus
Accusative sollemnem sollemne sollemnēs
sollemnīs
sollemnia
Ablative sollemnī sollemnibus
Vocative sollemnis sollemne sollemnēs sollemnia
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Catalan: solemne
  • English: solemn
  • French: solennel
  • Italian: solenne

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of sollemne (religious or solemn rite, ceremony).

NounEdit

sollemnis

  1. genitive singular of sollemne

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Nussbaum, Alan J. 1997, "The 'Saussure Effect' in Latin and Italic". In Lubotsky, Alexander, "Sound law and analogy: papers in honor of Robert S.P. Beekes on the occasion of his 60th birthday".