EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sooty, soty, equivalent to soot +‎ -y. Probably influenced by similar Middle English suti (dirty, filthy), derived from the same root as Old English besūtian (to befoul).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsʊti/
    • (file)
  • (dialectal) IPA(key): /ˈsʌti/
  • Rhymes: -ʊti

AdjectiveEdit

sooty (comparative sootier, superlative sootiest)

  1. Of, relating to, or producing soot.
  2. Soiled with soot
  3. Of the color of soot.
  4. (obsolete, literary) Dark-skinned; black.
    • 1834, William Gilmore Simms, Guy Rivers: A tale of Georgia
      While thus reduced, his few surviving senses were at once called into acute activity by the appearance of a sooty little negro, who placed within his grasp a misshapen fold of dirty paper, []
    • 1877, Henry Kendall, “Ode to a Black Gin”, in The Australian Town and Country Journal, page 24:
      And, though I've laughed at your expense, / O sister of the sooty hue, / No man who has a heart and sense / Would do one deed to injure you.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

sooty (third-person singular simple present sooties, present participle sootying, simple past and past participle sootied)

  1. To blacken or make dirty with soot.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From soot +‎ -y.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sooty (rare)

  1. Soiled with soot; sooty.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: sooty
  • Scots: suitie, sitty, sittie

ReferencesEdit