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See also: sablé and Sable

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

  • sa., s. (in heraldic contexts)

EtymologyEdit

Attested since 1275, from Middle English, from Old French sable and martre sable (sable martin), in reference to the animal or its fur; from Medieval Latin sabelum, from Middle Low German sabel (compare Middle Dutch sabel, Middle High German zobel); ultimately from a Balto-Slavic word (compare Russian со́боль (sóbolʹ), Polish soból, Czech sobol). Compare also Middle Persian smwl (*samōr).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈseɪbəl/, /ˈseɪbɫ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪbəl

NounEdit

 
A sable (Martes zibellina)

sable (countable and uncountable, plural sables)

  1. (countable) A small carnivorous mammal of the Old World that resembles a weasel, Martes zibellina, from cold regions in Eurasia and the North Pacific islands, valued for its dark brown fur (Wikipedia).
  2. (countable) The marten, especially Martes americana (syn. Mustela americana).
  3. (countable and uncountable) The fur or pelt of the sable or other species of martens; a coat made from this fur.
  4. (countable) An artist's brush made from the fur of the sable (Wikipedia).
  5. (heraldry) A black colour on a coat of arms (Wikipedia).
  6. (countable and uncountable) A black colour, resembling the fur of some sables.
    sable colour:  
  7. (in the plural, sables) Black garments, especially worn in mourning.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Young
      Sables wove by destiny.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter I, in The Younger Set (Project Gutenberg; EBook #14852), New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, published 1 February 2005 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 24962326:
      [] a delighted shout from the children swung him toward the door again. His sister, Mrs. Gerard, stood there in carriage gown and sables, radiant with surprise. ¶ "Phil!  You!  Exactly like you, Philip, to come strolling in from the antipodes—dear fellow!" recovering from the fraternal embrace and holding both lapels of his coat in her gloved hands.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sable (comparative more sable, superlative most sable)

  1. Of the black colour sable.
  2. (heraldry): In blazon, of the colour black.
  3. Made of sable fur.
  4. Dark, somber.
    • 1922, Michael Arlen, “3/2/1”, in “Piracy”: A Romantic Chronicle of These Days[1]:
      She turned and waved a hand to him, she cried a word, but he didn't hear it, it was a lost word. A sable wraith she was in the parkland, fading away into the dolorous crypt of winter.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Random House Dictionary, 2nd Edition, 1987.

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French sable and this from Late Latin sablum, from Latin sabulum, alternative form of sabulō. Compare sablera. Compare Italian sabbia, Occitan sabla.

NounEdit

sable m (plural sables)

  1. sand

Etymology 2Edit

From Spanish sable and this from French sabre, from German Säbel, from Hungarian szablya, cognate with Danish sabel, Russian са́бля (sáblja), Polish szabla, Serbo-Croatian сабља.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

sable m (plural sables)

  1. saber
  2. edge of a scythe

BasqueEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

sable

  1. sabre, saber

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sable m (plural sables)

  1. (heraldry) sable

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French, from Vulgar Latin or Late Latin sablum, from Latin sabulum, alternative form of sabulō. Compare sablon, which was used more often in Old French. Compare Italian sabbia, Occitan sabla.

NounEdit

sable m (plural sables)

  1. sand
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French martre sable (sable marten), an animal. From Middle Low German sabel (compare Middle Dutch sabel, Middle High German zobel); ultimately from a Balto-Slavic word (compare Russian со́боль (sóbolʹ), Polish soból, Czech sobol). Compare also Persian سمور (samur).

NounEdit

sable m (plural sables)

  1. (heraldry) The heraldic colour sable; black.

Etymology 3Edit

From sabler

VerbEdit

sable

  1. first-person singular present indicative of sabler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of sabler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of sabler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of sabler
  5. second-person singular imperative of sabler

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

 
sables

EtymologyEdit

14th century. From older savel, from *sabŏlos, from Proto-Celtic *samos (summer). Cognate with Portuguese sável and Spanish sábalo.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sable f (plural sables)

  1. allis shad
    • 1319, Ermelindo Portela Silva (ed.), La región del obispado de Tuy en los siglos XII a XV. Una sociedad en expansión y en la crisis. Santiago: Tip. El Eco Franciscano, page 393:
      vos que ayades esa renda da dizima dos savees e do pescado que y sayr en vossa vida e despos vosa morte que fique a nos o dito arynno
      you should have this rent of a tenth of the shads and of the fish that is captured there, in your life, and after your death this sand island should return to us
    Synonyms: sabenla, tasca, zamborca

ReferencesEdit

  • savees” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • sable” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • sable” in Santamarina, Antón (dir.), Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja: Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega (v 4.0). Santiago: ILG.
  • sábel” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ Coromines, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1991–1997). Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico. Madrid: Gredos, s.v. sábalo.

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

sable m (oblique plural sables, nominative singular sables, nominative plural sable)

  1. sable (fur of a sable)

PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sable m, f (plural sables, comparable)

  1. (heraldry) sable (of black colour on a coat of arms)

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

sable m (uncountable)

  1. (heraldry) sable (the black colour on coats of arms)

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sable (plural sables)

  1. (heraldry) sable

NounEdit

sable m (plural sables)

  1. saber, cutlass
  2. (fencing) saber

Derived termsEdit