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See also: Soot

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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English soot, soote, sote, sot, from Old English sōt[1], from Proto-Germanic *sōtą (soot), from Proto-Indo-European *sed- (to sit). Cognate with dated Dutch zoet (soot), German Low German Soot (soot), Danish sod (soot), Swedish sot (soot), Icelandic sót (soot). Compare similar ō-grade formation the same Proto-Indo-European root in Old Irish suide (soot) and Balto-Slavic: Lithuanian súodžiai (soot), and Proto-Slavic *saďa (soot) (Russian са́жа (sáža), Polish and Slovak sadza, Bulgarian са́жда (sážda)).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sʊt/, /suːt/
  • (now dialectal) IPA(key): /sʌt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʊt, -uːt
  • Homophone: suit (in some dialects)

NounEdit

soot (usually uncountable, plural soots)

  1. Fine black or dull brown particles of amorphous carbon and tar, produced by the incomplete combustion of coal, oil etc.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

soot (third-person singular simple present soots, present participle sooting, simple past and past participle sooted)

  1. (transitive) To cover or dress with soot.
    to soot land
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Mortimer to this entry?)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ soot” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English swōt.

AdjectiveEdit

soot

  1. Alternative form of swete

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English sōt, from Proto-Germanic *sōtą.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

soot (uncountable)

  1. soot
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit