English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From a UK dialect form of supple.

Adjective edit

souple (not comparable)

  1. Of raw silk: deprived of its silk-glue.

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

souple (plural souples)

  1. The part of a flail that strikes the grain.[1]

References edit

  1. ^ Edward H[enry] Knight (1877), “Souple”, in Knight’s American Mechanical Dictionary. [], volume III (REA–ZYM), New York, N.Y.: Hurd and Houghton [], →OCLC.

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin supplex.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /supl/
  • (file)

Adjective edit

souple (plural souples)

  1. supple
  2. yielding
  3. flexible

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Middle English edit

Etymology edit

Old French souple and Anglo-Norman souple, from Latin supplex

Adjective edit

souple

  1. flexible; supple
    • 14th Century, Chaucer, General Prologue
      His bootes souple, his hors in greet estaat.
      His boots flexible, his horse in a fine condition

Descendants edit

  • English: supple

Old French edit

Noun edit

souple m (oblique and nominative feminine singular souple)

  1. supple (which bends readily)
    • circa 1170, La vie de St. Emonde
      keue souple
      Supple tail