See also: Sous and sous-

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sous

  1. plural of sou

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sous (plural sous)

  1. Obsolete form of sou (French coin).
    • 1802, Laurence Sterne, A sentimental journey through France and Italy (page 28)
      The moment I cast my eyes upon him, I was predetermined not to give him a single sous []
  2. plural of sous

Etymology 3Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sous (plural sous)

  1. Short for sous-chef.
    • 2001, Jonathan Franzen, The Corrections
      Denise left the Generator [restaurant] in the hands of her sous and took the train to New York to bail out her feckless brother and entertain her parents.
    • 2014, Michael Gibney, Sous Chef: 24 Hours in the Kitchen
      A chef always looks out for his sous chef; a sous is always “under” his chef's wing—guided, nurtured, cared for, long after the stoves are turned off and the aprons are hung up. While other cooks are apprenticed to the kitchen, the sous is the lieutenant, the executor of Chef's wishes.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch saus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sœu̯s/
  • (file)

NounEdit

sous (plural souse, diminutive sousie)

  1. sauce

Derived termsEdit


CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronounEdit

sous

  1. (Alghero) masculine plural of sou

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

sous

  1. plural of sou

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French soubs, soubz, from Old French sus, sos, suz, soz, sost, from Latin subtus, which is derived from Latin sub.[1] Cognate to Italian sotto.

PrepositionEdit

sous

  1. below, under
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

sous m

  1. plural of sou
  2. (slang) money

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Picoche, Jacqueline; Jean-Claude Rolland (2009) Dictionnaire étymologique du français (in French), Paris: Dictionnaires Le Robert

Further readingEdit


Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French source (source).

NounEdit

sous

  1. source

MirandeseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sous

  1. masculine plural of sou

NormanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French sus, sos, suz, soz, sost, from Latin subtus, from sub.

PrepositionEdit

sous

  1. (Guernsey) below, under
Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

sous m pl

  1. plural of sou
  2. (Guernsey, plural only) money

Old CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin suōs.

AdjectiveEdit

sous

  1. masculine plural of sou