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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English stonen, alteration (due to stone) of earlier stenen, from Old English stǣnen (stony; of stone, hard as stone; stone, made of stone, built of stone), from Proto-Germanic *stainīnaz (made of stone), equivalent to stone +‎ -en. Cognate with Dutch stenen (stonen), German Low German stenen (stonen), German steinen (stonen).

AdjectiveEdit

stonen (comparative more stonen, superlative most stonen)

  1. (archaic) Consisting or made of stone.
    • 1869, William Barnes, Poems of rural life in common English:
      [] And up these well-worn blocks of stone / I came when I first ran alone, / The stonen stairs beclimb'd the mound, / Ere father put a foot to ground, []

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From earlier stenen, from Old English stǣnen, from Proto-Germanic *stainīnaz. Equivalent to stone +‎ -en (adjectival ending).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

stonen

  1. Composed or built of stone
DescendantsEdit
See alsoEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From stone; equivalent to stone +‎ -en (infinitival ending).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

stonen

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To throw stones
  2. (transitive) To stone, execute using stones
  3. (intransitive) To remove or eliminate stones or rocks
ConjugationEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From stone; equivalent to stone +‎ -en (plural ending).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stonen

  1. plural of stone