See also: impérative

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin imperātīvus.

Pronunciation edit

  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪmˈpɛɹ.ə.tɪv/
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Adjective edit

imperative (comparative more imperative, superlative most imperative)

  1. Essential; crucial; extremely important.
    That you come here right now is imperative.
    • 1941 May, “Jubilee of the City Tube”, in Railway Magazine, page 224:
      Meantime, alterations at King William Street had become imperative, and by December 22, 1895, the station had been remodelled, as at Stockwell, to provide an island platform with lines each side, and a scissors crossing.
    • 2019, Con Man Games, SmashGames, quoting Felix, Kindergarten 2, SmashGames:
      Give this document to Ozzy. It's imperative that he reads and understands it. Got it?
  2. (grammar) Of, or relating to the imperative mood.
  3. (computing theory) Having semantics that incorporates mutable variables.
    Antonym: functional
  4. Expressing a command; authoritatively or absolutely directive.
    imperative orders
    • 1612–1626, [Joseph Hall], “(please specify the page)”, in [Contemplations vpon the Principall Passages of the Holy Storie], volumes (please specify |volume=II, V, or VI), London, →OCLC:
      The suits of kings are imperative.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Noun edit

imperative (countable and uncountable, plural imperatives)

  1. (uncountable, grammar) The grammatical mood expressing an order (see jussive). In English, the imperative form of a verb is the same as that of the bare infinitive.
    Synonym: imperative mood
    Coordinate terms: assertoric, interrogative
    The verbs in sentences like "Do it!" and "Say what you like!" are in the imperative.
  2. (countable, grammar) A verb in imperative mood.
  3. (countable) An essential action, a must: something which is imperative.
    Visiting Berlin is an imperative.
    • 2014 March 1, Rupert Christiansen, “English translations rarely sing”, in The Daily Telegraph (Review), page R19:
      Anything grandiose or historically based tends to sound flat and banal when it reaches English, partly because translators get stuck between contradictory imperatives: juggling fidelity to the original sense with what is vocally viable, they tend to resort to a genteel fustian which lacks either poetic resonance or demotic realism, adding to a sense of artificiality rather than enhancing credibility.
    • 2020 December 2, Industry Insider, “The costs of cutting carbon”, in Rail, page 76:
      The new imperative for investment is the Government's objective to secure carbon-neutral transport emissions by 2040.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

References edit

Italian edit

Adjective edit

imperative f pl

  1. feminine plural of imperativo

Anagrams edit

Latin edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From imperātīvus (commanded), from imperō (command, order), from im- (form of in) + parō (prepare, arrange; intend).

Adverb edit

imperātīvē (not comparable)

  1. In an imperative manner, imperatively.

Related terms edit

References edit

  • imperative”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • imperative in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Romanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

imperative n pl

  1. indefinite plural of imperativ