succinct

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English succinte, succynt, from Old French succinct, from Latin succinctus, perfect passive participle of succingō (gird from below), from sub + cingō (gird, wrap, surround).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

succinct (comparative more succinct, superlative most succinct)

  1. brief and to the point
    You should give clear, succinct information to the clients.
    • 1961 February, R. K. Evans, “The role of research on British Railways”, in Trains Illustrated, page 94:
      The Derby Carriage Works foreman, when informed that this coach was to be run at 90 m.p.h. to obtain information on bogie hunting, is reported to have offered one succinct word of advice - "Don't!"
  2. compressed into a tiny area.
    Unlike general lossless data compression algorithms, succinct data structures retain the ability to use them in-place, without decompressing them first.
  3. (archaic) wrapped by, or as if by a girdle; closely fitting, wound or wrapped or drawn up tightly.

SynonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

succinct (feminine singular succincte, masculine plural succincts, feminine plural succinctes)

  1. succinct
  2. (informal, figuratively) light
    un repas succinct
    a light meal
  3. (by extension) Concise in its intentions.