EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

sware

  1. (archaic) simple past tense of swear
    • c. 1503–1512, John Skelton, Ware the Hauke; republished in John Scattergood, editor, John Skelton: The Complete English Poems, 1983, OCLC 8728872, lines 51–53, page 63:
      He shoke downe all the clothys,
      And sware horryble othes
      Before the face of God, []

NounEdit

sware (plural swares)

  1. (obsolete) Alternative form of swear

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sware

  1. attributive form of swaar

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

swarē

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐍅𐌰𐍂𐌴

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English swaru, from Proto-Germanic *swarō.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sware

  1. A response to a query or questioning; an answer.
  2. A statement or remark; something said.
  3. The taking of an oath or compact; a promise.
  4. (rare) An instance of profanity or swearing.
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: sware (obsolete); swear (remodeled on the verb swear)
  • Scots: swear (remodeled on the verb sweir)
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

sware

  1. Alternative form of swere

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

sware

  1. Alternative form of square

Etymology 4Edit

VerbEdit

sware

  1. Alternative form of swaren