English

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Etymology

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From swart +‎ -y.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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swarty (comparative more swarty, superlative most swarty)

  1. swarthy; tawny
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, →OCLC:
      From these first qualities arise many other second, as that of colour, black, swarty, pale, ruddy , &c.
    • 2002, Corneliu Leu, The Islands:
      Suddenly, the short, swarty man was again before us with his broad smile, so ill suited to the grim glint of his eyes, beckoning to us to gather round him.
    • 2016, Melanie Schwapp, Dew Angels:
      “This chile getting swartier every day,” he would complain to Mama, or he would cock his head towards the kitchen door and say, “Remember what happen to Mrs. Spence? That's exactly where you headin'!”

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for swarty”, in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, Springfield, Mass.: G. & C. Merriam, 1913, →OCLC.)

Anagrams

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