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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Anglo-Norman tawné, from Old French tané, past participle of taner (to tan), from tan (tanbark, tawny color), from Gaulish tanno (holm oak), from Proto-Indo-European *dhenh-. Compare Breton tann, Old Irish caerthann (rowan).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tawny (comparative tawnier, superlative tawniest)

  1. Of a light brown to brownish orange color.
    • 1865, Henry David Thoreau, Cape Cod, Chapter I. "The Shipwreck", page 14.
      There were the tawny rocks, like lions couchant, defying the ocean, whose waves incessantly dashed against and scoured them with vast quantities of gravel.
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows
      They fell a-twittering among themselves once more, and this time their intoxicating babble was of violet seas, tawny sands, and lizard-haunted walls.

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NounEdit

tawny

  1. A light brown to brownish orange colour.

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