See also: tåker and -taker

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English takere, equivalent to take +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

taker (plural takers)

  1. One who takes something.
    She is known as quite a risk taker.
    The hostage taker decided to surrender to the police.
    The study could not confirm the real percentage of drug takers in the country.
  2. A person or thing that takes or receives, often more than he or she gives.
    I don't want to be a relationship with you anymore - you are too much of a taker.
  3. One who is willing to participate in, or buy, something.
    • 2020 February 25, Christopher de Bellaigue, “The end of farming?”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Barely a decade ago, the notion that land should be managed in order to ensure planetary wellbeing had few takers among farmers whose raison d’etre was to fill human bellies at the lowest possible cost.
    Are there any takers for helping me clean the garage this weekend?
    I'm selling handmade postcards - any takers?

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CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortening of takirub.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: ta‧ker

NounEdit

taker

  1. a minx

AdjectiveEdit

taker

  1. minxish

Old FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *taikur. Cognates include Old English tācor and Old High German zeihhur.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tāker m

  1. brother-in-law

ReferencesEdit

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN