See also: Star, Stär, stár, står, śtar, and štar

English edit

 
Stars (1, 2).
 
A star shape (3).

Etymology edit

From Middle English sterre, from Old English steorra (star), from Proto-West Germanic *sterrō, variant of *sternō, from Proto-Germanic *sternô, *sternǭ (star), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr (star). Doublet of aster, stella, étoile, and estoile.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

star (plural stars)

  1. Any small, natural and bright dot appearing in the unobscured sky, especially in the night or twilight sky.
  2. (astronomy) A spheroid of plasma with sufficient gravity to fuse hydrogen or heavier elements into heavier elements still. Depending on context the Sun may or may not be included.
  3. (geometry) A concave polygon with regular, pointy protrusions and indentations, usually with four, five, or six points.
  4. (acting) An actor in a leading role.
    Many Hollywood stars attended the launch party.
  5. An exceptionally talented or famous person, often in a specific field; a celebrity.
    His teacher tells us he is a star pupil.
    • 1920, Mary Roberts Rinehart, Avery Hopwood, “The Shadow of the Bat”, in The Bat: A Novel from the Play (Dell Book; 241), New York, N.Y.: Dell Publishing Company, →OCLC, page 8:
      Star reporter, leg-man, cub, veteran gray in the trade—one and all they tried to pin the Bat like a caught butterfly to the front page of their respective journals—soon or late each gave up, beaten. He was news— [] —the brief, staccato recital of his career in the morgues of the great dailies grew longer and more incredible each day.
  6. (Jamaica, MLE, African-American Vernacular) (by extension) A friend, a mate, a pal.
    • 2003, Michael Maynard, Games Men Play, page 127:
      "Wha'ppen, star!" Hector said, grinning to reveal a gold-capped tooth. He told everyone it was solid twenty-four carat, but if it was, he would have wrenched it out with pliers to pawn to the highest bidder by now.
    • 2017, Les Back, New Ethnicities and Urban Culture: Racisms and Multiculture in Young Lives[1]:
      Switches character to the street-wise Ragamuffin, speaking out of the corner of his mouth in Creole: "Whappen now star! Seckle, seckle now people! Cool, cool na baass! [what is happening friends? Settle down]
    • 2022, Moses McKenzie, An Olive Grove in Ends[2]:
      'Dey ain't mine,' Stacey snapped, flicking her head towards the yutes in the bedroom. 'I'm juss lookin after dem fi mi fren dem. I only av six pickney by tree men enuh, star.'
  7. (printing) An asterisk (*) or symbol (★).
    • 1960 December, “The Glasgow Suburban Electrification is opened”, in Trains Illustrated, page 714:
      Above all, the 48-page timetables of the new service, which have been distributed free at every station in the scheme, are a model to the rest of B.R. For the first time on British Railways, so far as we are aware, a substantial timetable has been produced, not only without a single footnote but also devoid of all wearisome asterisks, stars, letter suffixes and other hieroglyphics.
  8. A symbol used to rate hotels, films, etc. with a higher number of stars denoting better quality.
  9. A simple dance, or part of a dance, where a group of four dancers each put their right or left hand in the middle and turn around in a circle. You call them right-hand stars or left-hand stars, depending on the hand which is in the middle.
  10. (astrology) A planet supposed to influence one's destiny.
    What's in the stars for you today? Find out in our horoscope.
  11. A star-shaped ornament worn on the breast to indicate rank or honour.
  12. A composition of combustible matter used in the heading of rockets, in mines, etc., which, exploding in the air, presents a starlike appearance.
  13. (networking) A network topology with multiple computers individually merging to one central switch, thus free of risk of collisions. A single point of failure can occur if the switch experiences corruption.

Synonyms edit

Hypernyms edit

Hyponyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Sranan Tongo: stari
  • Finnish: stara
  • French: star
  • German: Star
  • Italian: star
  • Swahili: staa

Translations edit

See also edit

Verb edit

star (third-person singular simple present stars, present participle starring, simple past and past participle starred)

  1. (intransitive) To appear as a featured performer or headliner, especially in an entertainment program.
    She starred in dozens of silent movies.
    • 1902, Robert Marshall Grade, The Haunted Major:
      I was inundated with invitations; [] I felt, indeed, much as a great actor must when he goes 'starring' in the provinces.
  2. (transitive) To feature (a performer or a headliner), especially in a movie or an entertainment program.
    The show stars Calista Flockhart as a high-powered lawyer.
    • 2004, David W. Menefee, The First Female Stars: Women of the Silent Era, page 4:
      "What followed this decision was exactly what we had expected: Mr. Fox, realizing that the public was tiring of Theda Bara in vampire roles, announced that he would star her in a production of Romeo and Juliet," she illustrated.
  3. (transitive) To mark with a star or asterisk.
  4. (transitive) To set or adorn with stars, or bright, radiating bodies; to bespangle.
  5. (intransitive) To shine like a star.

Synonyms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch star, from Old Dutch *star, from Proto-West Germanic *star, from Proto-Germanic *staraz.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

star (comparative starder, superlative starst)

  1. stiff, frozen
  2. rigid

Inflection edit

Declension of star
uninflected star
inflected starre
comparative starder
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial star starder het starst
het starste
indefinite m./f. sing. starre stardere starste
n. sing. star starder starste
plural starre stardere starste
definite starre stardere starste
partitive stars starders

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • star” in Woordenlijst Nederlandse Taal – Officiële Spelling, Nederlandse Taalunie. [the official spelling word list for the Dutch language]

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English star. Doublet of aster.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

star f (plural stars)

  1. star (celebrity)
    Elle est devenue star.She's become a star.

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Italian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English star.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈstar/
  • Rhymes: -ar
  • Hyphenation: stàr

Noun edit

star f (invariable)

  1. star (celebrity)

Anagrams edit

Jamaican Creole edit

Noun edit

star (plural star dem, quantified star)

  1. A friend, a mate, a pal
    • 2009, “Whe Dem A Go Run Go”‎[3]performed by Vybz Kartel, 01:58-02:01:
      Whe dem a go run go, Whe dem a go run go star? Start way dem caan run go far.
      Where are they going to, where are they going to run to friend? They start to go away but they can’t get far (before getting shot).

Maltese edit

Root
s-t-r
4 terms

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Arabic سِتَار (sitār).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

star m (plural stari)

  1. veil
    Synonym: (commoner) velu

Mirandese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin stāre.

Verb edit

star

  1. to be (indicates a temporary state)

See also edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Noun edit

star m (definite singular staren, indefinite plural starar, definite plural starane)

  1. alternative form of stare

Noun edit

star m (definite singular staren, indefinite plural starar, definite plural starane)

  1. (pre-2012) alternative form of stær

Portuguese edit

Verb edit

star (first-person singular present stou, first-person singular preterite stive, past participle stado)

  1. Obsolete spelling of estar

Conjugation edit

This entry needs an inflection-table template.

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English star. Doublet of aster and stea.

Noun edit

star n (plural staruri)

  1. star (famous person)

Declension edit

Sabir edit

Etymology edit

From Italian stare (to be).

Verb edit

star

  1. to be

References edit

  • Feissat et Demonchy, Dictionnaire de la Langue Franque, ou Petit Mauresque

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *starъ.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

stȁr (Cyrillic spelling ста̏р, definite stȃrī, comparative stàrijī)

  1. old
    Antonym: mlad

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • star” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • star” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovene edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *starъ.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

stȁr (comparative starȇjši, superlative nȁjstarȇjši)

  1. old, aged
    Antonym: mlad
    Star sem dvajset let.I'm twenty years old.

Inflection edit

 
The diacritics used in this section of the entry are non-tonal. If you are a native tonal speaker, please help by adding the tonal marks.
Hard
masculine feminine neuter
nom. sing. stàr stára stáro
singular
masculine feminine neuter
nominative stàr ind
stári def
stára stáro
genitive stárega stáre stárega
dative stáremu stári stáremu
accusative nominativeinan or
genitive
anim
stáro stáro
locative stárem stári stárem
instrumental stárim stáro stárim
dual
masculine feminine neuter
nominative stára stári stári
genitive stárih stárih stárih
dative stárima stárima stárima
accusative stára stári stári
locative stárih stárih stárih
instrumental stárima stárima stárima
plural
masculine feminine neuter
nominative stári stáre stára
genitive stárih stárih stárih
dative stárim stárim stárim
accusative stáre stáre stára
locative stárih stárih stárih
instrumental stárimi stárimi stárimi

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • star”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Venetian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin stāre, present active infinitive of stō. Compare Italian stare.

Verb edit

star

  1. (transitive) To stay or remain
  2. (transitive) To live (somewhere)

Conjugation edit

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.