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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the participle stem of Latin participare (to take part in, share in, give part in, impart), from particeps (taking part in, sharing in), from pars (part) + capiō (to take); see part and capable.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /pɑːˈtɪsɪpeɪt/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

participate (third-person singular simple present participates, present participle participating, simple past and past participle participated)

  1. (intransitive) To join in, to take part, to involve oneself (in something). [from 16th c.]
    • 2015 April 16, Jeré Longman, “At Marathon in North Korea, Curiosity Goes a Long Way”, in The New York Times[1]:
      For the second year, foreign amateur runners were allowed to participate in a 10-kilometer race, a half-marathon or a full marathon in Pyongyang, the capital. The races were a part of the April 15 birthday celebration of Kim Il-sung, the former leader of North Korea and father of his successors: Kim Jong-il, a son, and Kim Jong-un, a grandson.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To share, share in (something). [16th-19th c.]
    • 1638, Thomas Herbert, Some Yeares Travels, I:
      they seldome feed together, lest they might participate one anothers impurity: each has his owne cup [...].
  3. (obsolete) To share (something) with others; to transfer (something) to or unto others. [16th-18th c.]
    • 1662, Thomas Salusbury, Galileo's Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief Systems of the World, II:
      Make the Earth [...] turn round its own axis in twenty four hours, and towards the same point with all the other Spheres; and without participating this same motion to any other Planet or Star.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

participate (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Acting in common; participating.

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit