tracker

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

track +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tracker (plural trackers)

  1. Agent noun of track; one who, or that which, tracks or pursues, as a man or dog that follows game.
    1. (US politics) A person employed to follow and monitor a political rival.
  2. In an organ, a light strip of wood connecting (in path) a key and a pallet, to communicate motion by pulling.
  3. (computing) A type of computer software for composing music by aligning samples on parallel timelines.
    • 2004, "dilvie", new.scene.org (on newsgroup alt.music.mods)
      Trackers have broken out of the demoscene, are are[sic] now in use by thousands of professional musicians. It's not uncommon to hear about people using trackers on DJ forums, and electronic music production communities []
    • 2008, Karen Collins, Game sound:
      Although there were a few game companies outside the Amiga scene that used a tracker format (Epic Mega-Games, for instance), the majority used the better-supported MIDI.
    • 2018, Dafni Tragaki, Made in Greece: Studies in Popular Music:
      At the time, tracking chiptunes (i.e. using trackers) was the fundamental method of chipmusic-making.
  4. (computing) A musician who writes music in a tracker.
    • 1999, "Adrian Dunn", Re: Using a scanned picture in your demo (on newsgroup comp.sys.ibm.pc.demos)
      You can always find musicians. There are more trackers than coders, pixelers, organizers, couriers, and designers combined.
  5. (computing) A computer program that monitors something.
    1. (file sharing) Server software that coordinates peers in the BitTorrent protocol.
  6. (finance) A tracker mortgage.

Derived termsEdit

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