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See also: Note, noté, and Nöte

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English note, from Old English not, nōt (note, mark, sign) and Old French note (letter, note), both from Latin nota (mark, sign, remark, note).

NounEdit

note (countable and uncountable, plural notes)

  1. (heading) A symbol or annotation.
    1. A mark or token by which a thing may be known; a visible sign; a character; a distinctive mark or feature; a characteristic quality.
      • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie, London: William Stansbye, published 1622, book III, page 89:
        As therefore they that are of the Myſticall Body of Chriſt, haue thoſe inward Graces and Vertues, whereby they differ from all others which are not of the ſame Body ; againe, whoſoeuer appertaine to the Viſible Body of the Church, they haue alſo the notes of externall Profeſſion, whereby the World knoweth what they are.
      • 1841, John Henry Newman, “A Letter to the Right Reverend Father in God, Richard, Lord Bishop of Oxford, on Occasion of No. 90, in the Series Called The Tracts for the Times”, Oxford: John Henry Parker, page 39:
        She [the Anglican church] has the Note of possession, the Note of freedom from party-titles ; the Note of life, a tough life and a vigorous ; she has ancient descent, unbroken continuance, agreement in doctrine with the ancient Church.
      • 1888, Mary Augusta Ward, Robert Elsmere, volume I, London: Macmillan and Co., page 217:
        What a note of youth, of imagination, of impulsive eagerness, there was through it all !
      • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, in The China Governess[1]:
        The story struck the depressingly familiar note with which true stories ring in the tried ears of experienced policemen. No one queried it. It was in the classic pattern of human weakness, mean and embarrassing and sad.
    2. A mark, or sign, made to call attention, to point out something to notice, or the like; a sign, or token, proving or giving evidence.
    3. A brief remark; a marginal comment or explanation; hence, an annotation on a text or author; a comment; a critical, explanatory, or illustrative observation.
  2. (heading) A written or printed communication or commitment.
    1. A brief piece of writing intended to assist the memory; a memorandum; a minute.
      I left him a note to remind him to take out the trash.
    2. A short informal letter; a billet.
    3. A diplomatic missive or written communication.
    4. (finance) A written or printed paper acknowledging a debt, and promising payment
      a promissory note
      a note of hand
      a negotiable note
    5. (obsolete) A list of items or of charges; an account.
    6. A piece of paper money; a banknote.
      I didn't have any coins to pay with, so I used a note.
    7. (extension) A small size of paper used for writing letters or notes.
  3. (music, heading) A sound.
    1. A character, variously formed, to indicate the length of a tone, and variously placed upon the staff to indicate its pitch.
    2. A musical sound; a tone; an utterance; a tune.
      • 1667, John Milton, “Book III”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
        , lines 37–40:
        Then feed on thoughts, that voluntarie move / Harmonious numbers ; as the wakeful Bird / Sings darkling, and in ſhadieſt Covert hid / Tunes her nocturnal Note.
      • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, in The Celebrity:
        Judge Short had gone to town, and Farrar was off for a three days' cruise up the lake. I was bitterly regretting I had not gone with him when the distant notes of a coach horn reached my ear, and I descried a four-in-hand winding its way up the inn road from the direction of Mohair.
      • 1922, Michael Arlen, “Ep./4/2”, in “Piracy”: A Romantic Chronicle of These Days:
        As they turned into Hertford Street they startled a robin from the poet's head on a barren fountain, and he fled away with a cameo note.
    3. (extension) A key of the piano or organ.
  4. (uncountable) Observation; notice; heed.
  5. (uncountable) Reputation; distinction.
    a poet of note
  6. (obsolete) Notification; information; intelligence.
  7. (obsolete) Mark of disgrace.
SynonymsEdit

(mark of disgrace): blemish, blot, brand, reproach, stain, stigma, taint

Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

note (third-person singular simple present notes, present participle noting, simple past and past participle noted)

  1. (transitive) To notice with care; to observe; to remark; to heed.
    If you look to the left, you can note the old cathedral.
  2. (transitive) To record in writing; to make a memorandum of.
    We noted his speech.
  3. (transitive) To denote; to designate.
    The modular multiplicative inverse of x may be noted x-1.
  4. (transitive) To annotate.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of W. H. Dixon to this entry?)
  5. (transitive) To set down in musical characters.
  6. (transitive) To record on the back of (a bill, draft, etc.) a refusal of acceptance, as the ground of a protest, which is done officially by a notary.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English note (use, usefulness, profit), from Old English notu (use, enjoyment, advantage, profit, utility), from Proto-Germanic *nutō (enjoyment, utilisation), from Proto-Indo-European *newd- (to acquire, make use of). Cognate with West Frisian not (yield, produce, crop), Dutch genot (enjoyment, pleasure), Dutch nut (usefulness, utility, behoof), German Nutzen (benefit, usefulness, utility), Icelandic not (use, noun). Related also to Old English notian (to enjoy, make use of, employ), Old English nēotan (to use, enjoy), Old High German niozan (to use, enjoy), Modern German benutzen (to use). Related to nait.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

note (usually uncountable, plural notes)

  1. (uncountable, Britain dialectal, Northern England, Ireland, Scotland) That which is needed or necessary; business; duty; work.
    • 1303, Roberd of Brunnè, “The Seventh Commandment”, in Frederick James Furnivall, editor, Handlyng Synne, London: J. B. Nichols and Sons, published 1862, lines 2073–6, page 67:
      But þefte serueþ of wykkede note, / Hyt hangeþ hys mayster by þe þrote, / Or doþe hym lese hys godë fame, / Or bryngeþ hym oute of þe towne for shame.
    • 1387–1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, “The Reues Tale”, in The Canterbury Tales, [Westminster: William Caxton, published 1478], OCLC 230972125; republished as William Thynne, editor, The Woorkes of Geffrey Chaucer, Newly Printed, with Diuers Addicions, which were Neuer in Printe before: With the Siege and Destruccion of the Worthy Citee of Thebes, Compiled by Ihon Lidgate, Monke of Berie. As in the Table More Plainly Dooeth Appere, London: Imprinted at London, by Ihon Kyngston, for Ihon Wight, dwellying in Poules Churchyarde, 1561, OCLC 932919585, folio XVI, verso:
      The Miller goeth agayn, no word he ſaid / But doth his note, and wt theſe clerkes plaid / Til that her corne was faire & wel igrounde
    • 1838, William Marriott, “The Deluge”, in A Collection of English Miracle-Plays or Mysteries, Basel: Schweighauser & Co, page 11:
      And have thou that for thy note !
    • 1897 May 27, Halifax Courier, quoted in 1903, Joseph Wright, English Dialect Dictionary, volume IV, London: Henry Frowde, page 302:
      Tha'll keep me at this noit all day... Om always at this noit.
    • 1962, Arthur C. Cawley, Everyman, and Medieval Miracle Plays[2], page 125:
      Thou canst do thy note; that have I espied.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Ireland, Scotland) The giving of milk by a cow or sow; the period following calving or farrowing during which a cow or sow is at her most useful (i.e. gives milk); the milk given by a cow or sow during such a period.
    • 1843, The Farmer's Magazine, page 384:
      The supply of horned cattle at this fair was great, but the business done was confined to fleshy barreners of feeding qualities and superior new-calved heifers, and those at early note, with appearance of being useful; [...]
    • 1875, Belfast Paper:
      For sale, a Kerry cow, five years old, at her note in May.
    • 1888, S. O. Addy Gloss, Words Sheffield, page 160:
      A cow is said to be in note when she is in milk.
    • 1922, P. MacGill, Lanty Hanlon page 11:
      A man who drank spring water when his one cow was near note.
    • 1996, C. I. Macafee Conc., Ulster Dict. at Note:
      Be at her note, be near note, come forward to her note, of a cow or sow, be near the time for calving or farrowing.
Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology 1Edit

From English note, from Italian nota, from Latin nota.

NounEdit

note c (singular definite noten, plural indefinite noter)

  1. note
    Synonyms: notat, notits
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

VerbEdit

note

  1. (mechanics) To supply a board to a groove.
ConjugationEdit

Template:da-conj-base


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin nota.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

note f (plural notes)

  1. note (written or spoken)
  2. mark (UK), grade (US)
  3. bill (UK, US), check (US)
  4. (music) note
  5. touch, hint, note

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

note

  1. first-person singular present indicative of noter
  2. third-person singular present indicative of noter
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of noter
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of noter
  5. second-person singular imperative of noter

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

note

  1. feminine plural of noto

NounEdit

note f

  1. plural of nota

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

nōte

  1. vocative masculine singular of nōtus

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *nutu, from Proto-Germanic *hnuts.

NounEdit

nōte f

  1. nut (fruit)

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: noot
  • Limburgish: noeat (with unexpected oea)

Further readingEdit

  • note (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • note (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

note f (plural notes)

  1. (Jersey) tune

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nota

NounEdit

note m (definite singular noten, indefinite plural noter, definite plural notene)

  1. (music) a note
  2. a note in a book or text
  3. a note (communication between governments)
  4. a banknote

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin nota

NounEdit

note m (definite singular noten, indefinite plural notar, definite plural notane)

  1. (music) a note
  2. a note in a book or text
  3. a note (communication between governments)
  4. a banknote
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

note

  1. past participle of nyta

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

note m (plural notes)

  1. (computing) Clipping of notebook (notebook computer).

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

note

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of notar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of notar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of notar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of notar

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

note f pl

  1. plural of notă

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English not, note, noote, from Old English notu (use; utility; benefit), from Proto-Germanic *nutō (use; enjoyment). More at note.

NounEdit

note (uncountable)

  1. use; benefit
  2. necessity; occasion
  3. business; employment
  4. task; duty
  5. purpose; function; office

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English noten, notien, from Old English notian (to make use of; employ; enjoy), from Proto-Germanic *nutōną (to make use of; enjoy).

VerbEdit

note (third-person singular present notes, present participle notin, past nott, past participle nott or notten)

  1. To use; employ; make use of
  2. To need

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

note

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of notar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of notar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of notar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of notar.

VenetianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin noctem, accusative of nox (compare Italian notte), from Proto-Indo-European *nókʷts.

NounEdit

note f (plural noti)

  1. night