See also: Traire and trairé

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French traire, treire (to pull), from Vulgar Latin *tragere, from Latin trahere, present active infinitive of trahō (I pull), from Proto-Indo-European *tragʰ- (to draw, drag).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tʁɛʁ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛʁ
  • (file)

VerbEdit

traire

  1. (transitive) to milk (a cow, etc)

ConjugationEdit

This verb traditionally has no past historic or imperfect subjunctive. They would be formed on a -tray- root: *je trayis, *que nous trayissions etc. Forms using the ‘a’ endings of verbs in -er are now used when there is an unavoidable need to use these forms. The root -trais- was used instead of -tray- in the 18th century, and remains in Swiss and Savoy dialects.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French traire.

VerbEdit

traire

  1. to fire (an arrow)
    • circa 1369, Jean Froissart, Chroniques:
      arbalestriers commencierent a traire sur le chastel
      [the] crossbowmen started to fire at the castle

DescendantsEdit

  • French: traire

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French traire, from Latin trahō (I pull).

VerbEdit

traire

  1. to pull
  2. to milk

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *tragere, present active infinitive of *tragō, from Classical Latin trahō (I pull).

VerbEdit

traire

  1. to pull
  2. (chiefly of a weapon) to draw; to unsheathe
  3. to pull out (extract by pulling); to remove (by pulling)
    • circa 1150, Thomas d'Angleterre, Le Roman de Tristan, page 164 (of the Champion Classiques edition, →ISBN, line 1980:
      Un anel d'or trait de sun dei
      she removed a gold ring from her finger
    • circa 1170, Wace, Le Roman de Rou:
      A plusurs fist traire les denz
      For many, he pulled out their teeth

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb ends in a palatal stem, so there is an extra i before the e of some endings. This verb has irregularities in its conjugation. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *tragere, present active infinitive of *tragō, from Classical Latin trahō (I pull).

VerbEdit

traire

  1. to pull

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit