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EnglishEdit

NounEdit

trou (uncountable)

  1. (New Zealand, US) trousers
  2. (US) rowing spandex shorts

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • OED 2006

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch trouwen (similar root to Engl. "troth")

VerbEdit

trou (present trou, present participle trouende, past participle getrou)

  1. to marry

Usage notesEdit

  • Alongside regular het getrou, this verb has an alternative irregular past tense is getroud, which can be read both as active and passive:
Dit is die kerk waar ons op die ouderdom van 20 jaar getroud is. — “This is the church where we married (or: were married) at the age of 20.”
  • The above construction refers to the past and is clearly verbal. Beyond this, getroud can also be an adjective in a phrase like the following:
Ons is gelukkig getroud. — “We are happily married.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin traugus, a "barbarous" Latin word first attested in the Ripuarian Law, probably related to torus (round hill).[1] Thought to be of Celtic, specifically Gaulish, origin.

Related to Catalan trauc, Occitan trauc.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tʁu/
  • (file)

NounEdit

trou m (plural trous)

  1. hole

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Parker (1844): The Classical Museum a Journal of Philology, Ancient History and Literature, p. 123

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit