Danish

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Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Old Saxon thiudisc, from Proto-West Germanic *þiudisk, from Proto-Germanic *þiudiskaz (of or relating to a people), cognate with German deutsch, Dutch Duits, and English Dutch.

The Old Icelandic form þýðverskr is remodelled from þýzkr after the old suffix for ethnonyms -verr (from Proto-Germanic *warjaz), compare also Icelandic Þjóðverji (a German). The adjective is derived form the noun Proto-Germanic *þeudō (people, nation), whence Old Norse þjóð and Danish tjod. Originally, the adjective was not an ethnonym, but designated the vernacular language in opposition to Latin. This is the meaning of theodiscus in eighth-century Latin texts.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /tysk/, [ˈtˢysɡ̊]
  • Audio:(file)

Adjective

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tysk (plural and definite singular attributive tyske)

  1. German (relating to the country, people or language of Germany)

Hyponyms

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Noun

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tysk n (definite (rare) tysken)

  1. German (the language)

Further reading

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Norwegian Bokmål

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Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

Etymology

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From Old Norse þýðverskr, þýzkr, from Proto-Germanic *þiudiskaz (of or relating to a people), from Proto-Germanic *þeudō (people, nation), from Proto-Indo-European *tewtéh₂ (people).

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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tysk (neuter singular tysk, definite singular and plural tyske)

  1. German (relating to Germany and the German people)

Derived terms

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Noun

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tysk m (definite singular tysken, uncountable)

  1. German (the German language)

Derived terms

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References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology

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From Old Norse þýðverskr, þýzkr, from Proto-Germanic *þiudiskaz (of or relating to a people), from Proto-Germanic *þeudō (people, nation), from Proto-Indo-European *tewtéh₂ (people).

Adjective

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tysk (neuter singular tysk, definite singular and plural tyske)

  1. German (relating to Germany and the German people)

Derived terms

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Noun

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tysk m (definite singular tysken, uncountable)

  1. German (the German language)

Derived terms

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References

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Swedish

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Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Etymology

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From Old Swedish thysker, þȳdisker, thȳdzkir, þȳþisker, thȳdisker, (Old Norse þýðverskr), from Proto-Germanic *þiudiskaz, from *þeudō (folk), from Proto-Indo-European *tewtéh₂ (people).

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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tysk (comparative tyskare, superlative tyskast)

  1. German; of or pertaining to Germany

Declension

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Inflection of tysk
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular tysk tyskare tyskast
Neuter singular tyskt tyskare tyskast
Plural tyska tyskare tyskast
Masculine plural3 tyske tyskare tyskast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 tyske tyskare tyskaste
All tyska tyskare tyskaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic

Noun

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tysk c

  1. German (a person (chiefly male) from Germany)

Declension

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Declension of tysk 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tysk tysken tyskar tyskarna
Genitive tysks tyskens tyskars tyskarnas

Derived terms

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References

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Anagrams

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