See also: german and Germán

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia
German edition of Wiktionary

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Germānus, Germānī (“the peoples of Germānia”), as distinct from Gauls (in the writings of Caesar and Tacitus), and of uncertain ultimate origin (possibly Celtic/Gaulish).

Not related to german (closely related) or germane (from the Latin adjective germānus, through Old French).

Attested since at least 1520. Replaced the older terms Almain and Dutch (from Proto-Germanic *þiudiskaz) in English. Besides cognates of German, Almain, and Dutch, two other categories of words for the Germans in other languages are cognates of Saxon and descendants of Proto-Slavic *němьcь; see those entries for more.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

German (countable and uncountable, plural Germans)

  1. (countable) A native or inhabitant of Germany; a person of German citizenship or nationality.
  2. A member of the Germanic ethnic group which is the most populous ethnic group in Germany; a person of German descent.
  3. (historical) A member of a Germanic tribe.
    Synonym: Teuton
    Rome was sacked by Germans and the Western Roman Empire collapsed.
  4. A German wine.
    • 1996, Jim Ainsworth, Passport's Guide to Britain's Best Restaurants:
      The wine list harbours some great bottles, mature clarets and Burgundies as well as a clutch of fine Germans (gold-dust these days in restaurants) []
  5. (uncountable, US printing, rare, dated) A size of type between American and Saxon, 1+12-point type.
  6. (MLE, slang) A Germany-produced car, a “German whip”.
    • 2021 May 21, Big Tobz in Big Tobz & Blittz (lyrics), Fumez The Engineer (music), “Plugged In Freestyle”‎[1], 0:13–0:16:
      In my German, they calling me a baller (skrr)
      Got me feeling like Özil
  7. (Britain, slang) A prison warder
    • 1996, Angela Devlin, Prison Patter[2], Waterside Press, →ISBN:
      There are some 32 different terms for prison officers, from the humorously affectionate kanga(rhyming slang:kangaroo = screw) and the variants Scooby-Doo and Dr. Who via the mildly confrontational German (as if still the enemy over 50 years after World War II!) to the outright abuse of shit-parcel.

SynonymsEdit

HypernymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Proper nounEdit

German

  1. (uncountable) An Indo-European (Indo-Germanic) language, primarily spoken in Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein, South Tyrol, Switzerland, Luxembourg, and a small part of Belgium.
    Synonym: (rare) Deutsch
    Meronyms: Low German (Plattdeutsch), High German
    German has three genders: masculine, feminine and neuter.
  2. A surname​.

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from German (noun)

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

German (comparative more German, superlative most German or Germanest)

  1. Of or relating to the nation of Germany.
    • 2001, Donald L. Niewyk, The Jews in Weimar Germany, →ISBN, page 31:
      In Prussia, always the most progressive of the German states during the Weimar years and a stronghold of the two parties, Jews could be found in virtually all administrative departments [] .
  2. Of or relating to the natives or inhabitants of Germany; to people of German descent.
    Her German husband has blond hair.
    • 2005 May 23, Gavriel D. Rosenfeld, The World Hitler Never Made: Alternate History and the Memory of Nazism[3], Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 182:
      If Demandt's essay served as a strident example of the German desire for normalcy, a more subtle example was provided by a brief allohistorical depiction of a Nazi victory in World War II written by German historian Michael Salewski in 1999.
    • 1889, Theodore S. Fay, The three Germanys: glimpses into their history, vol. II, p. 1270 (inside the index):
      Goths, a German tribe, 9; allied with other tribes against Rome, 39; [...]
  3. Of, in or relating to the German language.
    Synonym: (rare) Deutsch
    Meronyms: Low German, High German
    Because the instructions were German, Yves couldn't read them.
    • 1816, George Henry Noehden, A Grammar of the German Language, 3rd edition, page 3:
      In this manner there existed, about the time of the Reformation, three grand divisions of the German language, viz. the Upper German (Ober Deutsch), the Low German (Nieder Deutsch, or Platt Deutsch), and lastly the High German (Hoch Deutsch).
    • 1838, Joseph Bosworth, A Dictionary of the Anglo-saxon Language, page xiii:
      To trace its progress, it will be necessary to enter into detail, and to examine the German language in its two great divisions, the Low and High German.
    • 1990, Charles V.J. Russ, Introduction, in: Charles V.J. Russ (ed.), The Dialects of Modern German: A Linguistic Survey, p. xviii (note: the work covers Frisian, Low and High German dialects):
      This volume is intended to provide a survey of the linguistic characteristics of modern German dialects [...]. These are defined geographically as those within the borders of the Federal Republic of Germany, the German Democratic Republic, Austria, the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg, the German-speaking part of Switzerland, and Alsace in France ([..]).

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from German (adjective)

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


BasqueEdit

Proper nounEdit

German ?

  1. A male given name

ReferencesEdit

  • Xarles Bidegain, Izendegia, 1999, Elkarlanean, Donostia, →ISBN, page 190

GermanEdit

 
German Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia de

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

German n (strong, genitive Germans, plural Germane)

  1. (organic chemistry) germane

DeclensionEdit


NormanEdit

Proper nounEdit

German m

  1. A male given name

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡěrmaːn/
  • Hyphenation: Ger‧man

Proper nounEdit

Gèrmān m (Cyrillic spelling Гѐрма̄н)

  1. German (member of a Germanic tribe)

DeclensionEdit