uncial

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Attested 1650, from Latin uncia (one twelfth part, ounce, inch).

AdjectiveEdit

uncial (comparative more uncial, superlative most uncial)

  1. (rare) Of, or relating to an ounce, or an inch, especially to letters printed an inch high.

Etymology 2Edit

Attested 1712, from Late Latin unciales (uncials), unciales litterae (uncial letters) (Jerome), plural of uncialis (pertaining to one twelfth part, ounce, or inch), from uncia (one twelfth part, ounce, inch). The literal meaning is unclear: some references indicate "inch-high letters", but see “Uncial script” in Wikipedia.

AdjectiveEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

uncial (comparative more uncial, superlative most uncial)

  1. Of, or relating to a majuscule style of writing with unjoined, rounded letters, originally used in the 4th–9th centuries.

NounEdit

uncial (plural uncials)

  1. A style of writing using uncial letters.
  2. A letter in this style.
  3. A manuscript in this style.

Derived termsEdit

  • semi-uncial, half-uncial

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • uncial” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.

AnagramsEdit


SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

uncial m, f (plural unciales)

  1. uncial

NounEdit

uncial f (plural unciales)

  1. uncial
Last modified on 20 November 2013, at 08:04