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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Mid 16th century, from Latin ursinus, adjectival form of ursus (bear).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ursine (comparative more ursine, superlative most ursine)

  1. Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of bears.
    • 1832, Godfrey Mundy, Pen and Pencil Sketches, Being the Journal of a Tour in India, London: John Murray, Vol. 1, Chapter VI, p. 320, [1]
      The British chief having undergone the ursine embrace of the Seikh monarch, the whole cavalcade proceeded towards the town.
    • 1924, Herman Melville, Billy Budd, London: Constable & Co., Chapter 8, [2]
      [] the old man's eccentricities, sometimes bordering on the ursine, repelled the juniors []
    • 2004, in Donald G. Lindburg and Karen Baragona (eds.), Giant Pandas: Biology and Conservation, Berkeley: University of California Press, Part Two, Introduction, p. 77, [3]
      [] we noted that a preponderance of the evidence supports an ursine origin for the giant panda.
  2. Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of the bear subfamily Ursinae.
    • 2004, in Donald G. Lindburg and Karen Baragona (eds.), Giant Pandas: Biology and Conservation, Berkeley: University of California Press, Part Two, Introduction, p. 37, [4]
  3. (entomology, of caterpillars) Covered in stiff bristles.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

ursine (plural ursines)

  1. (zoology) A bear.

AnagramsEdit


InterlingueEdit

NounEdit

ursine (plural ursines)

  1. sea urchin
  2. Any member of Ursinae, a subfamily of Ursidae.

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ursīne

  1. vocative masculine singular of ursīnus