See also: veiné

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French vene, from Old French veine, from Latin vēna, of uncertain Proto-Indo-European origin.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /vɛn/
  • (file)

NounEdit

veine f (plural veines)

  1. (anatomy) vein
  2. (geology) vein, seam
  3. (informal) luck

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Romanian: venă
  • Vietnamese: ven

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Anglo-Norman veine, from Latin vēna.

NounEdit

veine (plural veines)

  1. (anatomy) vein (blood vessel)
Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Old French. (This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

veine (plural veines)

  1. (Christianity) An act of penitence or supplication involving some form of kneeling or prostration.
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

veine (third-person singular simple present veineth, present participle veinende, simple past and past participle veined)

  1. Alternative form of waynen (to transport via wagon)

Etymology 4Edit

AdjectiveEdit

veine

  1. Alternative form of vein

Etymology 5Edit

NounEdit

veine (plural veines)

  1. Alternative form of vine (vine)

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French veine, from Latin vēna.

NounEdit

veine f (plural veines)

  1. (Jersey, anatomy) vein

Derived termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vēna.

NounEdit

veine f (oblique plural veines, nominative singular veine, nominative plural veines)

  1. (anatomy) vein

DescendantsEdit


WogeoEdit

NounEdit

veine

  1. woman

ReferencesEdit

  • Stephen Adolphe Wurm,New Guinea Area Languages and Language Study (1976): PAN *binay, *babinay woman: the longer forms coming into PN as wahine, is present in Manus as *pihin, "bihin, and in Wogeo as veine, [...]
  • Herbert Ian Hogbin, The Leaders and the Led: Social Control in Wogeo, New Guinea (1978)