See also: Vane, vaně, vanë, and väne

EnglishEdit

 
cat-shaped weather vane (1)
 
rotary vane pump (2)
 
vane (sense 3, key 1.) of a feather, consisting of barbs (key 3.)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English vane, Southern Middle English variant of fane, from Old English fana (cloth, banner, flag), from Proto-Germanic *fanô. Cognate with Saterland Frisian Foone (flag, banner) and German Fahne. Compare obsolete fane (weathercock).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vane (plural vanes)

  1. A weather vane.
  2. Any of several usually relatively thin, rigid, flat, or sometimes curved surfaces radially mounted along an axis, as a blade in a turbine or a sail on a windmill, that is turned by or used to turn a fluid.
  3. (ornithology) The flattened, web-like part of a feather, consisting of a series of barbs on either side of the shaft.
    Synonym: vexillum
    Meronym: barb
  4. (navigation) A sight on a sextant or compass.
  5. (weaponry) One of the metal guidance or stabilizing fins attached to the tail of a bomb or other missile.
    Synonym: fin

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vane m

  1. vocative singular of van

VerbEdit

vane

  1. third-person singular present of vanout

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse vani.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /vaːnə/, [ˈvæːnə]

NounEdit

vane c (singular definite vanen, plural indefinite vaner)

  1. habit
  2. practice

InflectionEdit


EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

vane

  1. in vain

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vane f pl

  1. feminine plural of vano

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vāne

  1. vocative masculine singular of vānus

AdverbEdit

vānē (comparative vānius, superlative vānissimē)

  1. in vain, vainly
    "dum bona vane laudata Pharisaei perierint, et peccata publicani accusata evanueritnt." Regula coenobialis
    While the good things of the vainly praised Pharisee will perish, also will the sins of the accused tax collector fade away.

ReferencesEdit

  • vane in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • vane in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

vane

  1. Alternative form of fane (flag, vane)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse vani

NounEdit

vane m (definite singular vanen, indefinite plural vaner, definite plural vanene)

  1. a habit, custom

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse vani

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vane m (definite singular vanen, indefinite plural vanar, definite plural vanane)

  1. a habit, custom
    • 1957, Tarjei Vesaas, Fuglane:
      Hege hadde for lang tid sidan slutta og bedi han halde seg ifrå denna trøyttande vanen.
      Hege had long ago stopped asking him to refrain from this tiresome habit.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit