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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin veridicus ‎(truly said), from verus ‎(true) and dīcō ‎(I say).

AdjectiveEdit

veridical ‎(comparative more veridical, superlative most veridical)

  1. True.
  2. Pertaining to an experience, perception, or interpretation that accurately represents reality; as opposed to imaginative, unsubstantiated, illusory, or delusory.
    Few believe that all claimed religious experiences are veridical.
    • 1995, Herbert Simon, "Guest Editorial", Public Administration Review, vol. 55, no. 5, p. 404:
      There was great need for empirical research that would build a more veridical description of organizations and management.

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