Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin virāgo(warlike or heroic woman).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

virago ‎(plural viragos or viragoes)

  1. A woman given to undue belligerence or ill manner at the slightest provocation; a shrew, a termagant.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 22, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Not unnaturally, “Auntie” took this communication in bad part. Thus outraged, she showed herself to be a bold as well as a furious virago. Next day she found her way to their lodgings and tried to recover her ward by the hair of the head.
  2. A woman who is scolding, domineering, or highly opinionated; a fishwife, a nag.
  3. A woman who is rough, loud, and aggressive.

QuotationsEdit

1964, Joan was all Arden, grinning there, siding with her virago mother. — Anthony Burgess, Nothing Like the Sun

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

virago f (invariable or literary plural: viragini)

  1. amazon

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From vir(man).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

virāgō f ‎(genitive virāginis); third declension

  1. a warlike woman

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative viragō viraginēs
genitive viraginis viraginum
dative viraginī viraginibus
accusative viraginem viraginēs
ablative viragine viraginibus
vocative viragō viraginēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit