Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin virāgo (warlike or heroic woman).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /vɪˈɹɑːɡəʊ/
  • Hyphenation: vi‧ra‧go

NounEdit

virago (plural viragos or viragoes)

  1. A woman given to undue belligerence or ill manner at the slightest provocation; a shrew, a termagant.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 22, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Not unnaturally, “Auntie” took this communication in bad part. Thus outraged, she showed herself to be a bold as well as a furious virago. Next day she found her way to their lodgings and tried to recover her ward by the hair of the head.
  2. A woman who is scolding, domineering, or highly opinionated; a fishwife, a nag.
  3. A woman who is rough, loud, and aggressive.

QuotationsEdit

1964, Joan was all Arden, grinning there, siding with her virago mother. — Anthony Burgess, Nothing Like the Sun

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: vi‧ra‧go

NounEdit

virago f (invariable or literary plural: viragini)

  1. amazon

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From vir (man).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

virāgō f (genitive virāginis); third declension

  1. a warlike woman

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative viragō viraginēs
genitive viraginis viraginum
dative viraginī viraginibus
accusative viraginem viraginēs
ablative viragine viraginibus
vocative viragō viraginēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin virāgō.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: vi‧ra‧go

NounEdit

virago f (plural viragos)

  1. (pejorative) a manly woman