vulgus

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *wel (to throng, crowd), see also Welsh gwala (sufficiency, enough), Middle Breton gwal'ch (abundance), Ancient Greek εἰλεῖν (eilein, to throng, press), Sanskrit वर्ग (varga, group, division).

Some have attempted, without success, to link it to Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁-go, whence English folk.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vulgus n, m (genitive vulgī); second declension

  1. (uncountable) the common people
  2. (uncountable) the public
  3. throng, crowd
  4. gathering

InflectionEdit

Second declension neuter with nominative/accusative/vocative in -us.

Number Singular
nominative vulgus
genitive vulgī
dative vulgō
accusative vulgus
ablative vulgō
vocative vulgus

Vulgus is also rarely encountered as a regular masculine second declension noun.

Second declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative vulgus vulgī
genitive vulgī vulgōrum
dative vulgō vulgīs
accusative vulgum vulgōs
ablative vulgō vulgīs
vocative vulge vulgī

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 13:11