Last modified on 9 May 2015, at 11:41

vulgo

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vulgo.

AdverbEdit

vulgo (not comparable)

  1. In the vernacular; commonly known as.
    • 1735, Philip Miller, The Gardeners Dictionary:
      PERICLYMENUM; Trumpet Honeysuckle; vulgô.
    • 1822, George Woodley, A view of the present state of the Scilly Islands, 264-5:
      [Pope's Hole] derives its name from its being a place of shelter to some puffins, vulgo "popes".
    • 1828, John Walters, An English and Welsh Dictionary, page 304:
      A cow desiring the bull [vulgò a tufty cow]

NounEdit

vulgo (uncountable)

  1. The masses.

SynonymsEdit

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vulgus.

NounEdit

vulgo m (plural vulgos)

  1. the common people, the masses.

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From vulgus (the public, the common people).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

present active vulgō, present infinitive vulgāre, perfect active vulgāvī, supine vulgātum

  1. I broadcast, publish, divulge, issue, make known among the people.
  2. I make common, prostitute.
  3. I cheapen, degrade.

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AdverbEdit

vulgō (not comparable)

  1. generally, usually
  2. universally
  3. publicly, commonly, popularly

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vulgus (the common people), from Proto-Indo-European *wel (to throng, crowd).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vulgo m (plural vulgos)

  1. the common people, the masses

AdverbEdit

vulgo (not comparable)

  1. vulgarly, in the vulgar language

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vulgus.

NounEdit

vulgo m (plural vulgos)

  1. the common people, the masses

Related termsEdit


SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vulgo

  1. (slang) vulgar; of bad taste

See alsoEdit