Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vulgo.

AdverbEdit

vulgo ‎(not comparable)

  1. In the vernacular; commonly known as.
    • 1735, Philip Miller, The Gardeners Dictionary:
      PERICLYMENUM; Trumpet Honeysuckle; vulgô.
    • 1822, George Woodley, A view of the present state of the Scilly Islands, 264-5:
      [Pope's Hole] derives its name from its being a place of shelter to some puffins, vulgo "popes".
    • 1828, John Walters, An English and Welsh Dictionary, page 304:
      A cow desiring the bull [vulgò a tufty cow]

NounEdit

vulgo ‎(uncountable)

  1. The masses.

SynonymsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vulgus.

NounEdit

vulgo m ‎(plural vulgos)

  1. the common people, the masses.

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From vulgus(the public, the common people).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

vulgō ‎(present infinitive vulgāre, perfect active vulgāvī, supine vulgātum); first conjugation

  1. I broadcast, publish, divulge, issue, make known among the people.
  2. I make common, prostitute.
  3. I cheapen, degrade.

InflectionEdit

   Conjugation of vulgo (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present vulgō vulgās vulgat vulgāmus vulgātis vulgant
imperfect vulgābam vulgābās vulgābat vulgābāmus vulgābātis vulgābant
future vulgābō vulgābis vulgābit vulgābimus vulgābitis vulgābunt
perfect vulgāvī vulgāvistī vulgāvit vulgāvimus vulgāvistis vulgāvērunt, vulgāvēre
pluperfect vulgāveram vulgāverās vulgāverat vulgāverāmus vulgāverātis vulgāverant
future perfect vulgāverō vulgāveris vulgāverit vulgāverimus vulgāveritis vulgāverint
passive present vulgor vulgāris, vulgāre vulgātur vulgāmur vulgāminī vulgantur
imperfect vulgābar vulgābāris, vulgābāre vulgābātur vulgābāmur vulgābāminī vulgābantur
future vulgābor vulgāberis, vulgābere vulgābitur vulgābimur vulgābiminī vulgābuntur
perfect vulgātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect vulgātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect vulgātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present vulgem vulgēs vulget vulgēmus vulgētis vulgent
imperfect vulgārem vulgārēs vulgāret vulgārēmus vulgārētis vulgārent
perfect vulgāverim vulgāverīs vulgāverit vulgāverīmus vulgāverītis vulgāverint
pluperfect vulgāvissem vulgāvissēs vulgāvisset vulgāvissēmus vulgāvissētis vulgāvissent
passive present vulger vulgēris, vulgēre vulgētur vulgēmur vulgēminī vulgentur
imperfect vulgārer vulgārēris, vulgārēre vulgārētur vulgārēmur vulgārēminī vulgārentur
perfect vulgātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect vulgātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present vulgā vulgāte
future vulgātō vulgātō vulgātōte vulgantō
passive present vulgāre vulgāminī
future vulgātor vulgātor vulgantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives vulgāre vulgāvisse vulgātūrus esse vulgārī vulgātus esse vulgātum īrī
participles vulgāns vulgātūrus vulgātus vulgandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
nominative genitive dative/ablative accusative accusative ablative
vulgāre vulgandī vulgandō vulgandum vulgātum vulgātū

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AdverbEdit

vulgō ‎(not comparable)

  1. generally, usually
  2. universally
  3. publicly, commonly, popularly

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vulgus(the common people), from Proto-Indo-European *wel(to throng, crowd).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vulgo m (plural vulgos)

  1. the common people, the masses

AdverbEdit

vulgo (not comparable)

  1. (formal) introduces a colloquial synonym, or a nickname; vulgarly/colloquially/informally/commonly known as
    Ele sofre de tireomegalia, vulgo papeira.
    He suffers from thyromegaly, commonly known as goitre.
    René Higuita, vulgo O Escorpião, foi um goleiro colombiano.
    René Higuita, nicknamed The Scorpion, was a Colombian goalkeeper.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vulgus.

NounEdit

vulgo m ‎(plural vulgos)

  1. the common people, the masses

Related termsEdit


SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vulgo

  1. (slang) vulgar; of bad taste

See alsoEdit