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See also: Wedder

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

wed +‎ -er

NounEdit

wedder (plural wedders)

  1. A married person.
    • 1864, St. James' Magazine and United Empire Review (volume 9, page 239)
      The wedder of the heiress! is his lot all bliss when he has made the grand coup, and married for money after a long career of debts, difiiculties, and dishonoured bills? I think not; []
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

wedder (plural wedders)

  1. (obsolete, regional) Alternative form of wether (castrated buck goat or ram)
    • 1829, Walter Scott, Rob Roy, Introduction to the 1829 edition,[1]
      They then retreated to an out-house, took a wedder from the fold, killed it, and supped off the carcass, for which (it is said) they offered payment to the proprietor.
    • 1840, Patrick Leslie, Diary entry for 21 February, 1840, cited in Henry Stuart Russell, The Genesis of Queensland, Sydney: Turner & Henderson, 1888, Chapter 7,[2]
      Our stock consisted of four thousand breeding ewes in lamb, one hundred ewe hoggets, one thousand wedder hoggets, one hundred rams, and five hundred wedders, three and four years old.

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From wedden (to bet, wager) +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wedder m (plural wedders, diminutive weddertje n)

  1. (literally) A wagerer, one who bets
  2. A gambler, someone given to wagers and gambles

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English wether, wethir, wedyr, from Old English weþer (wether, ram), from Proto-Germanic *weþruz (wether), from Proto-Indo-European *wet- (year).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈwɛdər], [ˈwɪdɪr], [ˈwadər]
  • (Mid Northern) IPA(key): [ˈwɪdɪr]

NounEdit

wedder (plural wedders)

  1. wether (castrated male sheep)

Derived termsEdit