See also: Weder

Alemannic GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German wedar (which of the two), from Proto-West Germanic *hwaþar, from Proto-Germanic *hwaþeraz, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷóteros.

Compare German weder (neither), Dutch weer (again), English whether, Icelandic hvor (which), Gothic 𐍈𐌰𐌸𐌰𐍂 (ƕaþar, which).

ConjunctionEdit

weder

  1. (Uri) neither

InterjectionEdit

weder

  1. (Uri) Indicates that one is resuming what they were previously saying after being interrupted: "anyways", "back to what I was saying"

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eːdər

Etymology 1Edit

AdverbEdit

weder

  1. (dated) Alternative form of weer (again)
Derived termsEdit

generally parallel to a weer- equivalent

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

weder n (uncountable, diminutive wedertje n)

  1. Dated form of weer (weather).

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

weder m (plural weders, diminutive wedertje n)

  1. Archaic form of weer (wether).

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German wedar, from Proto-West Germanic *hwaþar, from Proto-Germanic *hwaþeraz; cognate with English whether and either.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

weder

  1. neither (only with noch)
    weder Himmel noch Hölle
    neither heaven nor hell

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • weder” in Duden online
  • weder” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Middle DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Dutch wither, from Proto-Germanic *wiþrą (against), from Proto-Indo-European *wi-tero- (more apart), from *wi (separation).

PrepositionEdit

wēder [+accusative or dative]

  1. against, in opposition to, counter to
  2. contrary to

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Dutch withero.

AdverbEdit

wēder

  1. back
  2. again
  3. against
DescendantsEdit
  • Dutch: weder, weer
  • Limburgish: wieër

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Dutch wethar, from Proto-West Germanic *hwaþar, from Proto-Germanic *hwaþeraz.

PronounEdit

wēder

  1. who/what of two
  2. one of two, either of two
  3. (with negation) neither of two

ConjunctionEdit

wēder

  1. either
  2. neither
  3. whether

Etymology 4Edit

From Old Dutch *wedar, from Proto-Germanic *wedrą.

NounEdit

wēder n

  1. weather
  2. storm, strong wind
  3. air, sky
InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

From Old Dutch withero, from Proto-West Germanic *weþru, from Proto-Germanic *weþruz.

NounEdit

wēder m

  1. castrated ram, wether
InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English weder, from Proto-Germanic *wedrą, from Proto-Indo-European *wedʰrom.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈwɛdər/, /ˈwɛːdər/

NounEdit

weder

  1. weather, condition of the sky
  2. good weather
  3. bad weather

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *wedr, from Proto-Germanic *wedrą, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁dʰrom, from the root *h₂weh₁- (to blow; wind) whence also wind and wāwan.

Cognate with Old French weder (West Frisian waar), Old Saxon wedar (Low German Weder), Dutch weder, Old High German wetar (German Wetter), Old Norse veðr (Swedish väder, Danish vejr); and more distantly with Old Church Slavonic ведро (vedro, fine weather) and Albanian vrëndë (light rain).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

weder n (nominative plural wedru)

  1. weather
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, On the Seasons of the Year
      Menn magon cēpan be þæs mōnan blēo hwelċ weder tōweard biþ.
      People can observe from the color of the moon what kind of weather is coming.
    Iċ hine ǣrest ġeseah on þæs ġēares anġinne. Iċ wāt for þon hit wæs ċeald weder, swīðe ċeald on þā tīd.
    I first saw him at the beginning of the year. I know because it was cold weather, very cold at the time.
  2. wind, storm, breeze, air

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Transylvanian SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *wiþrą (against), from Proto-Indo-European *wi-tero- (more apart), from *wi (separation).

AdverbEdit

weder

  1. again