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See also: Wonderly

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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English wonderly, wonderli, wonderlich, from Old English wundorlīċ, equivalent to wonder +‎ -ly.

AdjectiveEdit

wonderly (comparative more wonderly, superlative most wonderly)

  1. (archaic) wondrous; wondersome
    • 1812, 2014, Oliver Loo, The Original Grimm KHM 1812, page 330:
      The king sent his hunters over, they should see, what kind of animal was set in the tree, they came back and said: there lay such a wonderly animal therein, as they hade [sic] never seen in their life days, raw work of all kinds were on its skin, but it lay and slept.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English wonderly, wonderli, wonderliche, from Old English wundorlīċe, equivalent to wonder +‎ -ly.

AdverbEdit

wonderly (comparative more wonderly, superlative most wonderly)

  1. (archaic) Wonderfully, in a wonderful manner.
  2. (archaic) To a wonderful degree, exceedingly.
    • 1485 July 31, Thomas Malory, “Capitulum I”, in [Le Morte Darthur], book I, [London]: [] [by William Caxton], OCLC 71490786; republished as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, Le Morte Darthur [], London: Published by David Nutt, [], 1889, OCLC 890162034, page 001:
      :
      And in like wise as she said so they departed, that neither the king nor none of his council were ware of their departing. All so soon as King Uther knew of their departing so suddenly, he was wonderly wroth. Then he called to him his privy council, and told them of the sudden departing of the duke and his wife.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter primum, in Le Morte Darthur, book I:
      and in lyke wyse as she saide so they departed / that neyther the kynge nor none of his counceill were ware of their departyng Also soone as kyng Vther knewe of theire departyng soo sodenly / he was wonderly wrothe / Thenne he called to hym his pryuy counceille / and told them of the sodeyne departyng of the duke and his wyf