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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Presumably from the same origin as yard, from Old English ġerd (branch, twig, stick) or gierd, cognate with Middle Low German gêrde and Middle High German gęrte from Old High German gartia, from Proto-Germanic *gazdjō, derived from Proto-Indo-European *gʰasdʰeh₂. May be related to English and Scots yerk (to whip, beat, strike, especially with a stick).

VerbEdit

yerd (third-person singular simple present yerds, present participle yerding, simple past and past participle yerded)

  1. (rare) To beat with a stick

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Inherited from Old English ġeard, from Proto-Germanic *gardaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰórdʰos; cognate with Old Church Slavonic градъ (gradŭ) and a doublet of garth.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈjɛːrd/, /ˈjɛrd/
  • (Late ME) IPA(key): /ˈjard/

NounEdit

yerd

  1. A fenced piece of land; a yard:
    1. The property of a manor or other large rural dwelling.
    2. A churchyard; a piece of land around a church.
    3. A paddock; a field that has been fenced in.
  2. A plot of land; a piece of property, especially agricultural.
  3. A garden; a plot of horticultural land.
DescendantsEdit
  • English: yard
  • Scots: yerd, yaird, yird
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English ġerd.

NounEdit

yerd

  1. Alternative form of ȝerde (bar)

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English yerd, from Old English ġeard, from Proto-Germanic *gardaz. Cognate with English yard.

NounEdit

yerd

  1. earth, ground

Derived termsEdit